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Skippy Scout users get access to satellite imagery

The Skippy Scout mobile phone ‘crop walking’ app that controls drones for crop scouting missions will provide satellite imaging data to complement its ‘snapshot’ imagery through a partnership agreement with French agri-tech business SpaceSense.

Through the new partnership, Skippy Scout users can access up-to-date satellite image field maps to help plan and carry out targeted scouting within fields for a quick and efficient insight into crop health.

Five times faster at crop scouting

“Skippy Scout is up to five times faster at crop scouting than traditional crop walking,” points out app creator Jack Wrangham. “Incorporating satellite data will help users decide where and when to monitor crops based on GAI, weed detection, leaf formation and soil moisture.

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The Skippy Scout app calculates representative sampling points then flies a drone to capture images that are sent to the user’s mobile phone. - Photo: Skippy Scout
The Skippy Scout app calculates representative sampling points then flies a drone to capture images that are sent to the user’s mobile phone. - Photo: Skippy Scout

“SpaceSense satellite mapping will tell users where to look in a field and Skippy Scout will enable users to identify what potential problems may need to be addressed.”

Skippy Scout was developed to take over from traditional crop walking as a quicker and more representative means of assessing potential weed, pest, disease and nutrition problems in crops.

It automatically flies a drone to points in a field, where images are captured and sent to the user’s phone for review.

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The high-resolution images give an insight into crop health, pest, weed and disease issues without having to walk the crop. - Photo: SkippyScout
The high-resolution images give an insight into crop health, pest, weed and disease issues without having to walk the crop. - Photo: SkippyScout

Import field maps from any source

A new feature is the ability to import field maps from any source – including satellite images, screenshots of maps generated in other apps and photographs of printed maps.

These can be edited and scaled, given scouting locations and used to fly a drone to take images at those points.

The additional feature of access to satellite imagery will provide data on crop health, crop moisture and soil moisture that could be useful in determining where to take scouting snapshots.

Sami Yacoubi of SpaceSense said: “Our technology enables farmers to get a full vision of their fields every few days, mere hours after the image has been taken by the satellite. This ensures field data is always up to date which will help farmers make quick decisions.”

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  • Jack Wrangham, creator of the Skippy Scout app. - Photo: SkippyScout

    Jack Wrangham, creator of the Skippy Scout app. - Photo: SkippyScout

  • The partnership with SpaceSense gives Skippy Scout users access to satellite imagery of the fields. - Photo: SkippyScout

    The partnership with SpaceSense gives Skippy Scout users access to satellite imagery of the fields. - Photo: SkippyScout

More advanced machine learning technology

The two tech partners say they are building more advanced machine learning technology to interpret crop performance based on their respective high resolution imagery and satellite earth observation.

Ultimately, they want to be capable of providing a service that analyses crops and offers advice to growers based on images taken by drone and data collected by satellite.

“The combination of our technology can save time, reduce chemical use and improve crop performance,” says Jack Wrangham.

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